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Category: Night Photography

Fishing Haven, Umpqua River, and the Southern Cascades

Fishing Haven, Umpqua River, and the Southern Cascades

Steamboat InnSo earlier in the year my long lost cousin contacted me out of the blue on Facebook and said she and her husband just bought the Steamboat Inn and invited me to stay there a few days and do some photography.  Adventure?  Cool people to hang with?  Wine?  Yes please, to all of the above.

What made them want to invest into this historical inn?  They loved the outdoors, fishing, etc. and wanted to be full-time business owners, leaving their job at the country club.  Sometimes you gotta just let go and go for your dream and I’m excited for them.

The Steamboat Inn is a major landmark on the Umpqua River on Highway 138.  It’s a haven for fishermen, winetasters, hikers, and generally people who want to get away from the busy life in the city at least for a while.  No phone service so you can have an excuse not to talk to your boring work friends, but there is wi-fi so you can at least get some social media fix in.

Lamb dinner

Oregon territory wine
My cousin once-removed is the official greeter of the inn.

The food was phenomenal.  First night I believe was mushroom ravioli.  Next night was roasted lamb, and the next was the best slowroasted steak I’d ever had.  Pair that with local wines and wow.  The chef’s a cool guy too as well as the staff.

In the meantime during the day, I explored the Umpqua Forest.  There are so many cool sites to see whether you’re there for fishing, hiking, or photography and site-seeing.

Most of the hikes are fairly short and reasonable and lead to scenic waterfalls and sweeping views of the Umpqua. Among them were Toketee Falls, Steamboat Falls, Clearwater Falls, Susan Creek Falls, and Deadline Falls, as well as Big Bend Pool at Steamboat Creek, which is a major local spot with scores of fish, but not permitted for fishing.

The drive along the river alone is a scenic adventure as you wind left and right, up and down with the turquoise waters of the Umpqua right to the side.

Susan Creek Falls
Susan Creek Falls
Toketee Falls
Toketee Falls

The inn itself has great scenery as the backyard has a viewpoint of the Umpqua River.  The stars were out, and so clear away from the city, I had to get myself out of bed for some night photography.

Steamboat InnThe 3rd night I got a shot of the inn and John the chef who knew some photography himself helped me with some of the lighting on the building.  We hung out and chatted under the stars while shooting.

I’ll remember that night talking philosophy, life, art, travel, etc, while he smoked a cigarette and I messed around getting settings.  It was so chill and being away from work and citylife was just awesome.

We talked about how apocalyptic the area around Crater Lake was.  He mentioned he’d seen Thielsen one time from afar and had to look it up.  That steep pointed Tolkieneque peak is not something you see every day.


After leaving I dropped by  my aunt and uncle who now live in a house across the river from the inn.  I remember visiting them out in Eugene a few years ago and listening to his jazz record collection with him.  Retired and helping take care of their grandkids, they’re now living the life by the Umpqua.

I also drove further down Highway 38 to the Diamond Lake area for views of Mount Thielsen and Mount Bailey.  And while I was there I figured I might as well drive further down and check out Crater Lake with snow on top.

Mount Thielsen
Mount Thielsen

Crater Lake was actually a long drive, because you have to go around to the South entrance as the North was snowed in.  Well worth it for a winter view though, and the roads are well kept and plowed regularly.  Crater Lake is even better with snow.

So thanks again to my relatives who treated me well there.  Cheers to new ventures, whether in business or traveling the world.  If you’re ever in the Umpqua Forest area, be sure to stop by and say hi to them and enjoy some food and cheer at the Steamboat Inn!

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A Windy Night at Mitchell Point

A Windy Night at Mitchell Point

Moon over the Columbia GorgeFinding purpose as a landscape and night photographer is definitely fulfilling.  But it has its drawbacks.  The risks and hardship that come with venturing beyond your usual routine and what you know could be considered a drawback or a reward in itself from the experience.

On one episode of America’s National Parks on the National Geographic Channel, they filmed Saguaro National Park in Arizona, with spectacular footage of a thunderstorm in the desert in HD.

You can experience a bit of beauty and terror at home as lightning strikes and huge clusters of rain drop like bombs to the thirsty dry below.  The sky turns orange and gray, and windows of sun move through the swirling dark clouds.

I’m also thinking, what type of crazy cameramen would dare venture in there to film this?  Hardcore National Geo cameramen, that’s who.

Thunderstorms in the PNW are more like scattered showers and cloud burps, so though I haven’t filmed real thunderstorms, I do venture out at times to bits of the elements.

The rock hill in front of Mitchell Point was one site I’d staked out for nightshooting.  It’s away from the city, and yet it’s near I-84 for carlight shots along with a great view of the Columbia River and the Gorge.

So after hiking Mitchell point for some golden hour shots, I came back and hung out in the car awaiting the stars with a traveling dinner of Greek yogurt, crackers, cheese and energy bars.  Darkness soon fell and it was time.

gorge-sunset-colorsMany hikers are afraid of heights and sometimes go partly for that reason.  I’m not really afraid of heights, but when I was a kid I was afraid of the dark.  Not so much at home these days, but when I venture out at night, sometimes the old fears hang out in the back of my mind.

There are no ghosts, but what if you trip over a stick and fall off a ledge?  What if a black bear suddenly rushes out from the trees and eats you alive?  But I know those are normal weird thoughts a lot of people deal with.  There are times for caution, but sometimes you just have to logic things out and put the weird thoughts aside.

Couple darkness with wind and what you get can both scare you and exhilarate you.  And so I stepped forth from the parking lot.  It’s not really a hike, just a short climbing walk over a rocky hill to a viewpoint overlooking the freeway.  Short enough to carry my heavy-duty Tiltall tripod in one hand and my cellphone flashlight in the other, along with my camera and gear.

So when I got to the top… wow, what a view, and a bit vulnerable on a cliffside, though not that high.  Little did I know how windy it would get.

hole-in-shale-michelle-pointIt’s really an interesting spot as the Michelle Point cliff towers above you on one side and winds from the Gorge pummel you on the other.

There are foxholes made in the shale, I’m assuming from Native Americans on their quests long ago.  I only know this from hiking and researching Wind Mountain, a Native heritage site around the area, with similar structures on top.

Nightshot of I-84 and the Columbia Gorge

Night Photography Techniques

Here’s some technical photography, so scroll down if you don’t want a photography lesson, but just want to read the story.

People are asking me my settings and how I do nightshots, so here’s a simple lowdown.  You will need a DSLR, tripod, and editing software to do this:

Beforehand it helps to scout out a location in the daytime.  I’m often traveling and hiking in the daytime, and during my adventures I’m always on the lookout for good spots for night photography.  Generally open areas away from the city will do.  A plain open field or parking lot will work, but even better if you can get a landscape view, interesting subjects, architecture, etc.

Often I surf the web for viewpoints for stargazing.  Many parks close the gates at night, so make sure the spot you choose is accessible.  Hot clear days in the summertime are the best times to practice your starshots.

When out in the field, first, set the focus to manual and adjust it to “infinity”.  That’s the line just before the little figure-eight symbol on the focus ring on your lens.  A headlamp definitely helps with adjusting settings in the dark, but you want a low-light only when you need it, so your eyes can adjust to the dark.

I often bump up the ISO extremely high for fast test shots, then bring it back down and slow down the shutter for the real shots.  Some will tell you different, but my strategy for stars and very dark nights is 30 seconds, 4-5 f-stops, and around 3200 ISO.  They get noise from the high iso, but shooting in RAW helps in cleaning up the mess later on.

A few tips I’ve learned over time for post-editing:

  • Reduce noise in Raw
  • To bring out the stars, up the contrast and clarity.
  • When you have ground and other lights involved, such as this one of the Gorge, it makes it harder, so keep that in balance.  Some use several shots and layer them together, but start with simple and go on.

Best thing is practice.  If you’re not familiar with manual settings or nightshooting, you can practice in your backyard.  If there are lights around you’ll have to tone the shutter speed and ISO.  Practice with a tripod and photos around 8 seconds.  If you’re near a road, carlights are a fun subject which do the light painting for you.  Just stay far enough to be safe from the oncoming cars.

Lesson’s over, and now back to the story..

I stuffed the tripod into the ground and started testing.  Many times you’re shooting blind, since distant objects are too dark to appear in the viewfinder.  So I kept readjusting till I was getting what I wanted.  I alternated between taking shots and then crouching down, hanging on for dear life as the wind assaulted, then subsided.  For fun here’s a video selfie of me getting pulverized in the wind.

In certain places in the Gorge you feel the whole force of the bottleneck as winds pass through.  While I can’t say I’ve experienced God quite like Moses did when he had to hide in the cleft of the rock, I have been around strong winds and clouds.  When I was on Dog Mountain I’d huddle in a tree shelter as the elements pounded away like a storm.

After getting the shots needed and feeling the worst of the windy onslaughts, I’d had enough.  The worst is on top in the open air, but you can still feel it while climbing down the shale path.  After carefully making my way down, I finally made it back to the parking lot.

I could hear the sounds of freeway, river, winds, and the occasional train as I silently walked alone in the dark parking lot.  The Milky Way and Big Dipper silently shined overhead.  I felt alive, glad to have completed one more bucketlist item, and relieved at being away from the wind and darkness on top.  For parting ways I took one last shot of the Dipper, the North Star as a plane painted dotted light through the sky.

Big Dipper from the Mitchell Point parking lot

I’d had one more adventure.  As vivid as that desert storm on TV was, I’d never feel this alive while on the couch.  While I’m still not an athlete and don’t care for sports, I now can’t imagine how I spent so much time in my younger years just sitting around for hours with television or a game.  There comes a time where you need to experience life not just pretend.

This might not have been Everest or the Amazon Rainforest, but this was my experience.  As long as you keep challenging yourself a little bit you’ll do great.  It’s time to live life.

How are you living your story?  Tell me yours.  Let’s exchange adventure tales on Instagram, follow @OutbackTales.

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